2019 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Quantitative or Qualitative Research

Stacey Diane A. Litam

Stacey Diane A. Litam received the 2019 Outstanding Scholar Award for Quantitative or Qualitative Research for her article, “She’s Just a Prostitute: The Effects of Labels on Counselor Attitudes, Empathy, and Rape Myth Acceptance.”

Stacey Diane A. Litam (she, her, hers), PhD, NCC, CCMHC, LPCC, is an assistant professor of counselor education at Cleveland State University. Dr. Litam is a researcher, counselor educator, and social justice advocate on topics related to human sexuality, sex trafficking, and the phenomenological experiences of individuals who have intersecting marginalized identities.

As a scholar, Dr. Litam’s research has been published in prestigious journals such as The Professional Counselor (TPC), Journal of Sexual Aggression, and Journal of Child Sexual Abuse. Her doctoral dissertation, An Examination of Whether Scores of Attitudes Based on Labels and Counselor Attributes Predicted Scores of Human Relations and Beliefs About Rape in Counselors, won TPC’s 2019 Dissertation Excellence Award. In addition to her two TPC awards, Dr. Litam has won numerous awards for her academic and advocacy work, including a 2016 Doctoral Minority Fellowship from the NBCC Foundation, the 2016 Outstanding Doctoral Student of the Year award from the Ohio Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, the 2017 Humanistic Advocacy and Social Justice Award from the Association for Humanistic Counselors division of the American Counseling Association, the 2018 David K. Brooks Award from Chi Sigma Iota, and a 2019 Outstanding Service to Specialized Populations Award from NBCC.

She has facilitated over 70 refereed presentations at the national, regional, and state levels and actively contributes to peer-reviewed publications in journals, books, and edited volumes. Her professional interests encompass human sexuality, human trafficking, decolonizing the model minority stereotype, and the influence of internalized racism and intra-ethnic othering on Asian American identity development.

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.

2019 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Concept/Theory

Jennifer L. Rogers, Jamie E. Crockett, and Esther Suess

Jennifer L. Rogers, Jamie E. Crockett, and Esther Suess received the 2019 Outstanding Scholar Award for Concept/Theory for their article, “Miscarriage: An Ecological Examination.”

Jennifer L. Rogers, PhD, NCC, is an assistant professor in the Wake Forest University Department of Counseling. She received her PhD in counseling and counselor education from Syracuse University. Her clinical and research interests are centered around relational approaches to counseling, supervision, and counselor preparation across ecologically diverse practice contexts. Her current research focuses upon how attachment and cognitive patterns among beginning counselors influence their experiences during clinical supervision.

Jamie E. Crockett, PhD, NCC, LCMHCA, is an assistant professor in the Wake Forest University Department of Counseling and a clinical mental health counselor at Triad Counseling and Clinical Services. Her clinical and research interests include human development, attachment, gender and sexuality, reproductive health, grief and loss, contemplative and breath-based approaches, emotion, wellness, religion and spirituality, ethics, feminism, and diversity and culture.

Esther Suess, MA, NCC, LPC-A, LCMHCA, is a mental health counselor at the Mood Treatment Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, with a specialty in the treatment of eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder. She graduated with an undergraduate degree in psychology from University College Dublin in 2016 and received her master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Wake Forest University in 2018. Her research interests include cultural diversity and biopsychosocial factors in counseling and eating disorders.

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.

2018 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Quantitative or Qualitative Research

Michael T. Kalkbrenner and Christopher A. Sink

Michael T. Kalkbrenner and Christopher A. Sink received the 2018 Outstanding Scholar Award for Quantitative or Qualitative Research for their article, “Development and Validation of the College Mental Health Perceived Competency Scale.”

Michael T. Kalkbrenner, PhD, NCC, is an assistant professor of counseling and educational psychology at New Mexico State University. His research interests include college student mental health, interprofessional approaches to physical and mental wellness, and reducing barriers to counseling. He conducts quantitative and qualitative research, with an emphasis on quantitative methodology in psychometrics. Dr. Kalkbrenner has clinical experience providing counseling to a variety of populations in an array of different settings, including medical residents, veterans, college students, and children.

Christopher A. Sink, PhD, NCC, is a professor and the Batten Chair of Counseling and Human Services at Old Dominion University. His current research interests involve the intersection of mental and school-based counseling, psychometrics, social and emotional learning, ecological and systemic approaches to prevention, positive psychotherapy, and spirituality as an important feature of adolescent resiliency. Dr. Sink serves as the editor of the Journal of School-based Counseling Policy and Evaluation (International Society for Policy Research and Evaluation in School-Based Counseling) and associate editor for Counseling and Values (American Counseling Association). He has also served on the editorial boards of multiple peer-refereed journals, including The Professional Counselor (National Board for Certified Counselors), Professional School Counseling (American School Counselor Association), and Counselling and Spirituality (Saint Paul University, Canada).

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.

2018 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Concept/Theory

Jennifer L. Rogers, Dennis D. Gilbride, and Brian J. Dew

Jennifer L. Rogers, Dennis D. Gilbride, and Brian J. Dew received the 2018 Outstanding Scholar Award for Concept/Theory for their article, “Utilizing an Ecological Framework to Enhance Counselors’ Understanding of the U.S. Opioid Epidemic.”

Jennifer L. Rogers, PhD, NCC, is an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling at Wake Forest University. She received her doctorate in counseling and counselor education from Syracuse University, where she was a doctoral fellow. Her clinical and research interests include brief counseling interventions, clinical supervision, and relational approaches to counseling and counselor preparation across ecologically diverse practice contexts. Her current research focuses upon how attachment and cognitive patterns among beginning counselors influence their experiences during clinical supervision.

Dennis D. Gilbride, PhD, is currently a professor in the Counseling and Psychological Services Department at Georgia State University. He has published numerous articles along with book chapters related to disability, ethical decision-making, attachment, and supervision, as well as other counselor education issues. He received the James F. Garrett Award for Distinguished Career in Rehabilitation Research in 2013, and the Outstanding Faculty Research Award from the College of Education and Human Development at Georgia State University in 2015.

Brian J. Dew, PhD, has served as Chair of the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services at Georgia State University since 2011. His research has been focused on substance use—primarily on the topics of methamphetamine use and treatment, ecstasy use, and more recently, the spread of opiate consumption. Prior to his academic position at GSU, Dr. Dew worked as a substance abuse counselor in a hospital-based setting, where he developed and directed an intensive family program geared toward educating the non-addict on aspects of recovery. Over the past 12 years, Dr. Dew has served as Atlanta’s primary representative to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) Community Epidemiological Work Group, where he is responsible for reporting Atlanta drug trends to federal officials. Dr. Dew has been awarded the Outstanding Faculty Research Award from GSU’s College of Education and Human Development, and the Outstanding Addictions and Offender Professional Award by the Association of Addictions and Offender Counseling. Dr. Dew has made over 200 professional presentations, including keynote addresses and international trainings.

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.

2015 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Quantitative or Qualitative Research

Mary-Catherine McClain and Robert C. Reardon

Mary-Catherine McClain and Robert C. Reardon received the 2015 Outstanding Scholar Award for Quantitative or Qualitative Research for their article “The U.S. Workforce from 1960 to 2010: A RIASEC View.”

Dr. McClain is a licensed psychologist and adjunct professor at Mercer University, in Macon, Georgia. She currently works full-time at her private practice and teaches two courses at the university. Dr. McClain completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Johns Hopkins University Counseling Center and graduated with her MS, EdS, and PhD from Florida State University. She also holds the National Certified Counselor (NCC) certification. Dr. McClain’s areas of professional and research interest include career counseling, eating disorders treatment, crisis intervention and suicidality, self-care, and coping with symptoms of ADHD.

Dr. Reardon held full-time counseling and teaching positions at Florida State University from 1966 to 2007. He is now professor emeritus in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems and Senior Research Associate in the Career Center at FSU. Dr. Reardon has published more than 120 articles in professional journals, focusing on the research and development of innovative career interventions for college students and adults, and featuring the use of educational and occupational information. He received the Eminent Career Award from the National Career Development Association in 2003.

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.

2015 TPC Outstanding Scholar Award Winner – Concept/Theory

Seth C. W. Hayden, Derick J. Williams, Angela I. Canto, and Tyler Finklea


Seth C. W. Hayden, Derick J. Williams, Angela I. Canto, and Tyler Finklea received the 2015 Outstanding Scholar Award for Concept/Theory for their article “Shelter From the Storm: Addressing Vicarious Traumatization Through Wellness-Based Clinical Supervision.”

Seth C. W. Hayden is assistant professor of counseling at Wake Forest University. Dr. Hayden has provided career and personal counseling in community agencies, secondary school and university settings. Dr. Hayden’s research focuses on the career and personal development of military service members, veterans and their families. In addition, he explores the connection between career and mental health issues and integrated models of clinical supervision designed to facilitate positive growth in counselors’ ability to formulate interventions. Dr. Hayden is a licensed professional counselor in North Carolina and Virginia, a National Certified Counselor, a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, and an Approved Clinical Supervisor. He is former president of the Military and Government Counseling Association (MGCA), a division of the American Counseling Association.

Derick J. Williams is assistant professor and program area director of the Counselor Education program at the University of Virginia. He has taught full-time in Counselor Education for the past 10 years. He has been a faculty supervisor for students in clinical mental health counseling, student affairs and higher education, and school counseling. He coordinates the practicum and internship placements for pre-service school counselors and consults with site and fellow faculty supervisors to ensure effective delivery of supervision and optimal student learning. Dr. Williams has presented on the topic of supervision at state, regional and national conferences. He was a member of the 2016 CACREP Standards Revision Committee focusing on training and counselor preparation, including the integration of counselor training standards, professional practice and counseling supervision.

Angela I. Canto is assistant professor in the Psychological and Counseling Services program within the College of Education at Florida State University. Her program of research and clinical focus involves working with youth and families affected by trauma and crisis to identify malleable factors that impact social, behavioral and academic outcomes as well as developing effective interventions and training approaches to support professionals’ work with this population. She has provided group, family and individual mental health services in multiple settings and has supervised graduate students in counseling and school psychology. Her publication record includes 22 peer-reviewed articles and one book chapter.

Tyler Finklea is a doctoral candidate in combined counseling psychology and school psychology at Florida State University. She is currently completing a doctoral internship at American University’s Counseling Center, in Washington, DC. Her research interests include the intersection of career difficulties and mental health concerns, and her dissertation is a qualitative study looking at what psychopathologies are present in those with high levels of dysfunctional career thinking as measured by the MMPI-2 and Career Thoughts Inventory.

Dr. Hayden and Dr. Williams are National Certified Counselors (NCCs).

Read more about the TPC scholarship awards here.